Girls for Rasberry Pi

8 April, 2013

Using Smalltalk Scratch to teach young kids engineering. See girls encouraging girls to get into engineering. See a scratch demo, a Lego Doggie, a blinking pillow, hair lights, a door alarm, backpack break lights and turn signals, then spread the word and follow GirlsForRaspberryPi

Technology for everyone.

 

 

raspberrypi

From BetaNews: (see full article here: What does the future hold for Pi)

BetaNews: What does the future hold for the Pi — new versions?

Liz Upton: The Foundation’s committed to making sure that we don’t suddenly up-sticks and change the platform under people’s feet: the open community has been very good to us, and the last thing we want to do is to make the work they’ve done on the available software redundant. We want to continue selling the Raspberry Pi Model B for a good long time yet; we do have a final hardware revision to make, but the platform will be set in stone after that. We don’t have plans to make a new Pi at the moment; what we are putting a lot of effort into is improving the software stack. We reckon there are orders of magnitude of performance increases we can shake out of Scratch, for example; and this isn’t stuff you can expect the community to do, because it’s a very long and fiddly job. So Scratch, Wayland, Smalltalk: you should see some big improvements coming over this year. We’re also switching a lot of our concentration to our educational mission this year, after a year spent scrambling to get on top of manufacture.

Scratch is the cover story of the November 2009 issue of CACM, the monthly magazine of the Association for Computing Machinery.

Scratch is a visual programming language, developed in Squeak, that makes it easy to create interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art — and share these creations on the web. Aimed at children between the ages of 8 and 16, Scratch has developed a thriving community, with over 1000 new projects being uploaded to the site every day.

In inviting the Scratch team to submit an article, the editor of CACM explained his motivation: “A couple of days ago, a colleague of mine (CS faculty) told me how she tried to get her 10-year-old daughter interested in programming, and the only thing that appealed to her daughter (hugely) was Scratch.”

The submitted article is also available for viewing online.