Gilad Bracha – Utopia And Dystopia: Smalltalk And The Wider World

Many more videos available here:

Squeak Turns 20!

31 October, 2016

Please Donate to Squeak!

Craig Latta writes:

Hi all–

Happy 20th birthday to us! It was twenty years ago that Dan Ingalls and the rest of Alan Kay’s team announced Squeak to the world. You really changed things with this run at the fence. :)  Thanks again!

 

 


Back to the Future

The Story of Squeak, A Practical Smalltalk Written in Itself

by

Dan Ingalls Ted Kaehler John Maloney Scott Wallace Alan Kay

 

 

Plateau

7th Workshop on the Evaluation and Usability of Programming Languages and Tools (PLATEAU)

Co-located with SPLASH 2016

Amsterdam, Netherlands

PLATEAU 2016

http://2016.splashcon.org/track/plateau2016

CALL FOR PAPERS

Programming languages exist to enable programmers to develop software effectively. But how efficiently programmers can write software depends on the usability of the languages and tools that they develop with. The aim of this workshop is to discuss methods, metrics and techniques for evaluating the usability of languages and language tools. The supposed benefits of such languages and tools cover a large space, including making programs easier to read, write, and maintain; allowing programmers to write more flexible and powerful programs; and restricting programs to make them more safe and secure.

PLATEAU gathers the intersection of researchers in the programming language, programming tool, and human-computer interaction communities to share their research and discuss the future of evaluation and usability of programming languages and tools.

TOPICS

Some particular areas of interest are:

  • empirical studies of programming languages
  • methodologies and philosophies behind language and tool evaluation
  • software design metrics and their relations to the underlying language
  • user studies of language features and software engineering tools
  • visual techniques for understanding programming languages
  • critical comparisons of programming paradigms
  • tools to support evaluating programming languages
  • psychology of programming
  • domain specific language (e.g. database languages, security/privacy languages, architecture description languages) usability and evaluation

PLATEAU encourages submissions of three types of papers:

Research and position papers: We encourage papers that describe work-in-progress or recently completed work based on the themes and goals of the workshop or related topics, report on experiences gained, question accepted wisdom, raise challenging open problems, or propose speculative new approaches. We will accept two types of papers: research papers up to 8 pages in length; and position papers up to 2 pages in length.

Hypotheses papers: Hypotheses papers explicitly identify beliefs of the research community or software industry about how a programming language, programming language feature, or programming language tool affects programming practice. Hypotheses can be collected from mailing lists, blog posts, paper introductions, developer forums, or interviews. Papers should clearly document the source(s) of each hypothesis and discuss the importance, use, and relevance of the hypotheses on research or practice. In addition, we invite language designers to share some of the usability reasoning that influenced their work. These will serve as an important first step in advancing our understanding of how language design supports programmers.Papers may also, but are not required to, review evidence for or against the hypotheses identified. Hypotheses papers can be up to 4 pages in length.

Submission site: PLATEAU papers should be submitted via HotCRP.

https://plateau2016.hotcrp.com/

Format: Submissions should use the SIGPLAN Proceedings Format (http://www.sigplan.org/Resources/Author/), 10 point font. Note that by default the SIGPLAN Proceedings Format produces papers in 9 point font. If you are formatting your paper using LaTeX, you will need to set the 10pt option in the \documentclass command. If you are formatting your paper using Word, you may wish to use the provided Word template that supports this font size. Please include page numbers in your submission. Setting the preprint option in the LaTeX \documentclass command generates page numbers. Please also ensure that your submission is legible when printed on a black and white printer. In particular, please check that colors remain distinct and font sizes are legible.

All types of papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library at the authors’ discretion.

KEYNOTE

Alan Blackwell

Professor

Computer Laboratory

University of Cambridge

Cambridge, United Kingdom

http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~afb21/

DATES

Submission deadline: August 1, 2016

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Kelly Blincoe, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Jeff Carver, University of Alabama, USA

Kathi Fisler, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA

Tudor Gîrba, Independent, Switzerland

Stefan Hanenberg, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

Andrew Ko, University of Washington, USA

Brad Myers, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Peter-Michael Osera, Grinnell College, USA

Janet Siegmund, University of Passau, Germany

Jeremy Singer, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Emma Söderberg, Google, USA

Andreas Stefik, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA

Ian Utting, University of Kent, United Kingdom

Philip Wadler, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

ORGANIZERS

Craig Anslow, Middlesex University, UK

Thomas LaToza, George Mason University, USA

Joshua Sunshine, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

DeutschInLineCache

Mario Wolczko writes:

In early 2015 I was honored to be invited to develop and present a graduate course on Virtual Machines at UC Berkeley. The result is CS294-113: Virtual Machines and Managed Runtimes, which was presented in the Fall of 2015.

This page contains the materials from that course. All materials are Copyright © Oracle and Mario Wolczko, 2015-6, except as noted. The materials can be used non-commercially under the following Creative Commons license:

Virtual Machines and Managed Runtimes

Acknowledgements

I’d like to express my thanks to the following:

  • Patrick Li, my T.A. for the course. Patrick devised the Feeny language used in the exercises, wrote the Lab exercises and the model answers, and did all the grading,
  • Prof. Jonathan Bachrach for the invitation to give the course,
  • The guest speakers (in order of appearance): Peter Deutsch, Allan Schiffman, David Ungar, Cliff Click, Lars Bak, Carl Friedrich Bolz, Thomas Würthinger and Michael Van De Vanter,
  • My management at Oracle Labs for supporting this effort,
  • Michael Haupt for sharing his VM course material,
  • Christian Wimmer for assistance with Truffle, and
  • All the students who participated, for their patience, enthusiasm, attention, questions, efforts and feedback.

 

Excellent Description of Sista! Nice job Eliot and Clément!

Squeak in Action

12 May, 2016

squeak in action

Chris Muller posted:

The mission-control app I’ve been working on this year appeared in a special episode of CBBC Newsround yesterday!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/36247103

The segment about Reserve Protection Agency with several screenshots of the app begins at time index 9:40 and runs until 12:25.  I recommend watching the entire episode, though, it’s a worthwhile message.

No one will know it is powered by Squeak but that’s okay, the important message is the one about the danger faced by rhinos as a species.

ESUG’16 Registration

29 April, 2016

ESUG

Dear Smalltalkers,

ESUG’16 registration is open!

http://www.esug.org/wiki/pier/Conferences/2016/Conference-Registration

We also provide you a selected list of hotels here:

http://www.esug.org/wiki/pier/Conferences/2016/Hotels

See you @ Prague,

Luc


Dr. Luc Fabresse
Associate-Professor in Computer Science
Mines Douai, Institut Mines-Telecom, France
http://car.mines-douai.fr/luc/