tim

Don’t miss Tim’s interview with SmalltalkInspect!  You can find it here: Smalltalk under the Pi: an Interview with tim Rowledge

In this episode we talk to tim Rowledge about his work on Smalltalk VMs over the years, especially for the RISC OS Platform and ARM machines.. The latest and probably hottest thing in this arena is his port of Squeak to the Raspberry Pi. This is not only cool in itself, but more importantly enables Raspberry Pi users to use Scratch and EToys on this little machine on RISC OS (the Raspbian Linux version existed before). You can probably imagine how much fun we had in recording this session.

 

Etoys-iii

Don’t miss the new Etoys book: http://wiki.squeakland.org/index.php/LearningWithEtoysI3.

Etoys is:

  • an educational tool for teaching children powerful ideas in compelling ways
  • a media-rich authoring environment and visual programming system
  • a free software program that works on almost all personal computers

All school children should have the opportunity to engage with computers in the most meaningful way. Learning to think and using the computer to discover and work with powerful ideas is the knowledge of true value. The community of Etoys users is working toward the dream of having all students become computer literate. This book only covers a small portion of those items. As you and your students learn some of the basic techniques, you will find more and more uses for them. The process of learning Etoys is just that, a process; the learning is on-going even though projects are begun and finished. Students will enjoy becoming experts and sharing their knowledge with others in the classroom.

Imagine this: A group of learners want to visualize what they Imagine so they go to Etoys to Invent their dreams and Inspire each other by building on their various Etoys projects. Today’s learners need this kind of experience to be prepared for the future.

For more information about Etoys visit www.squeakland.org

Image

Bert Freudenberg announced new Smalltalk Bindings for Minecraft Pi.  See his blog post here.

There is a lot of hype surrounding JavaScript.

Years ago Google started the developing of V8, a super Just in time compiler for its Chrome Browser.

The V8 compiler revamped competition: Microsoft and Mozilla foundation strike back optimizing their JavaScript interpreters.

On these days, a strong community is growing using Node.js, a web server “Evented I/O [Web application server] for V8 JavaScript“. Node.js sposts a non-blocking architecture which can lead to very fast server, able to process a lot of request with a single thread.

A quick peek on the people now. Lars Bak is the leader of the V8 project. It has worked on the design of Self and on the HotSpot JIT.  Lars Bak also co authored “Mixin in StrongTalk”.

So a lot of the optimization which let  Smalltalk and Java shine, are used in the JavaScript field nowadays. It is a simple “accident”🙂 ?…or it is destiny?

JavaScript rocks? There is plenty of documentation all around, even if the first ECMA specification was quite unreadable in my humble opinion :) There are some optimal guidelines for JavaScript module writing, for instance see the manuals on JQuery plugin development. But in JavaScript you are still a free player if you wish: no rule, no even need of structuring your code in some way:

var sith={}

sith.name=”DarthVader”;

sith.name=function(){
return “Nevermind, I am a function, now”;
}

The code above builds a very generic object, and add to it properties (which could be a function).

Worst, you get very strange things, evaluting:

[1,2]+[3,4]

you got:

“1,23,4”

This because “+” is not supported for arrays, so the JavaScript  language is effectively doing…

([1,2]+””)+[3,4]

I like dynamic languages like Self, but this is somewhat too…flexible🙂

And last but not least JavaScript lacks a true integrated developement environment, even if here we smalltalkers could help a bit🙂

So, SmallTalk2012 is not this version of JavaScript, at least not yet; JavaScript Harmony specification is working hard trying to polishing the language…As usual, the better way to predict the future is to …invent it… So let’s give Harmony a chance!

Smalltalks 2011

27 June, 2011

Worried that you won’t be able to come to Edinburgh for ESUG 2011? Well how about joining your fellow Smalltalkers in Argentina in November for Smalltalks 2011?

The Smalltalks conference brings together more than 200 people from both academia and industry to discuss Smalltalk-based software over three days. Smalltalks conferences have included many high-quality presentations from industry and research, showing interesting applications of Smalltalk, advances in the Smalltalk language, didactic uses of Smalltalk and much more.

This year’s conference runs from 3rd—5th November at the Universidad Nacional de Quilmes (English site) in Bernal, Argentina (just 15km from Buenos Aires).

As in previous years, there will be a dedicated research track for original scientific contributions to, or using, Smalltalk in general. If you’re interested in submitting a paper for the conference, the hard deadline is 22nd August 2011, with notification of acceptance by 23rd September.

See the call for papers for more details of submission guidelines and criteria.

Stefan Marr has just announced on his blog the relase of RoarVM, the first single-image manycore virtual machine for Smalltalk. RoarVM is based on the work on Renaissance VM by David Ungar and Sam S. Adams at IBM Research, and was ported to x86 architecture by Stefan.

From his post: “The RoarVM supports the parallel execution of Smalltalk programs on x86 compatible multicore systems and Tilera TILE64-based manycore systems. It is tested with standard Squeak 4.1 closure-enabled images, and with a stripped down version of a MVC-based Squeak 3.7 image.” Support for Pharo 1.2 is currently limited to 1 core, but this is being worked on!

Here’s some indicative figures for this new VM (using an adapted version of tinyBenchmarks on an MVC image):

 1 core   66M bytecodes/sec;  3M sends/sec
 8 cores 470M bytecodes/sec; 20M sends/sec

As Stefan notes “The RoarVM is a research project and is not as optimized for performance as the standard Squeak VM”. For comparison:

Squeak 4.2.4beta1U, MVC image, OS X 555M bytecodes/sec; 12M sends/sec

so you’ll need a few cores active before you start to see improvements over your existing image! There are also a number of known issues with the current implementation.

You can download the code from the RoarVm page at GitHub, contribute to the discussion on the vm-dev mailing list, or follow #RoarVM updates on Twitter.

Lambda the Ultimate is celebrating 10 years of its own existence, 30 (nominal) years of Smalltalk-80 and PARC turning 40, by revisiting a classic article Design Principles Behind Smalltalk by Dan Ingalls. From the post: “Ingalls’s piece should be filed under Visionary Languages. Alas, no such category exists on LtU.” Does this mean that Smalltalk-80 was the last visionary language?