Check out Scratch in MagPi

30 October, 2015

scratch on pi

In this month’s MagPi magazine there is a (very) small article about the latest Pi Scratch and even a mention of Smalltalk in a review of a book on python programming.

Pages 80-1 & 86.



The Fundación Argentina de Smalltalk proudly invites you to one of the premier Smalltalk conferences in the world.  Let’s meet at Buenos Aires, November 11-13!  For more details, see the invitation here:


From Chris Muller:

I am pleased to announce version 1.5 of Magma for Squeak 5, now available on SqueakMap.  Magma allows multiple Squeak images to collaborate on a single, large object model, with the robustness and control expected from a database.  It offers the most transparent db access possible for Smalltalk, affording the user the ability to develop complex, performant designs, iteratively, on-the-fly.

It has been designed for “continuous flow” development, the way Smalltalkers like and expect to work.  For example, I could have connections open to 3 separate databases, open transactions in any of them, and having restructured a class hierarchy in the model, and stepping through the debugger when that “final boarding call” for my flight is announced.

Thanks to the image, this scenario has never been a problem for Smalltalkers and Magma is deliberate to ensure this flow is maintained.  Once at 10K feet, I can resume stepping through that same debugger within 5 seconds of restarting the image, DB connections intact, commit my transactions when I’m ready, done.  Magma handles every aspect of that use-case correctly even in multi-user environments, and has so many safety and integrity features, it is the safest way to develop and keep a model in Squeak.

This release coincides with the release of Squeak 5, and has many improvements and fixes over Magma 1.4.  Detailed notes about these improvements are available at

– Chris

Squeak 5 is out!

12 August, 2015


From: Chris Muller,

In the 17 months since Squeak 4.5 was released, a huge development effort took place to create the next generation virtual-machine for the Squeak / Pharo / Newspeak family of programming systems.  Squeak is the modern incarnation of the Smalltalk-80 programming environment originally developed at the Xerox PARC.

Bert VM Icon

“Squeak 5” introduces this new VM and associated new memory model, collectively referred to as “Spur”.  Presented [1] by Eliot Miranda and Clément Béra at the 2015 International Symposium on Memory Management, this new VM affords Squeak applications a significant boost in performance and memory management.  Among other optimizations, the #become operation no longer requires a memory scan.

Object pinning and ephemerons are also now supported.  The release notes [2] provide more details.


The new memory model requires a new image file format.  Although this new format results in about a 15% increased memory requirement for the same number of 4.x objects, a new segmented heap allows memory to be given back to the OS when its no longer needed, a great benefit for application servers.

As forward compatibility is as important to the Squeak community as backward compatibility, Squeak 5 is delivers an image with identical content as the recent 4.6 release.  Although this new Squeak 5 VM cannot open images saved under the prior 4.x Cog format, objects and code can be easily exported from the 4.x image and then imported into Squeak 5.  Applications whose code runs strictly above the Smalltalk meta layer will prove remarkably compatible with the new format, most applications will require no changes whatsotever.

Squeak 5 is the result of monumental effort by a tiny group of very talented people, but its also just the beginning of yet a new effort; Spur is just a stepping stone to a more ambitious goals planned over the next five years.

[1] — A Partial Read Barrier for Efficient Support of Live Object-oriented Programming[2] — Squeak 5 Release Notes


A lot of work has gone into the new website.  Go check it out!

Nice work to everyone that worked on it, it’s beautiful and well organized!

[announcement on Squeak-dev]

Dear Smalltalkers

I am pleased to announce new look of the Squeak Website

Personally, I want to thank Fabio Niephaus, who invested a lot of effort into the new site.

Best regards

-Tobias Pape

pittsburgDLS copy


C A L L   F O R   P A P E R S


======== DLS 2015 ===========

11th Dynamic Languages Symposium 2015

October, 2015

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Co-located with SPLASH 2015

In association with ACM SIGPLAN

The 11th Dynamic Languages Symposium (DLS) at SPLASH 2015 is the premier forum for researchers and practitioners to share knowledge and research on dynamic languages, their implementation, and applications. The influence of dynamic languages — from Lisp to Smalltalk to Python to Javascript — on real-world practice and research continues to grow.

DLS 2015 invites high quality papers reporting original research, innovative contributions, or experience related to dynamic languages, their implementation, and applications. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library, and freely available for 2 weeks before and after the event itself.  Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

Innovative language features and implementation techniques

Development and platform support, tools

Interesting applications

Domain-oriented programming

Very late binding, dynamic composition, and run-time adaptation

Reflection and meta-programming

Software evolution

Language symbiosis and multi-paradigm languages

Dynamic optimization

Hardware support

Experience reports and case studies

Educational approaches and perspectives

Semantics of dynamic languages

== Invited Speaker ==

DLS is pleased to announce a talk by the following invited speaker:

Eelco Visser: Declare your Language.

== Submissions and proceedings ==

Submissions should not have been published previously nor under review at other events. Research papers should describe work that advances the current state of the art. Experience papers should be of broad interest and should describe insights gained from substantive practical applications. The program committee will evaluate each contributed paper based on its relevance, significance, clarity, length, and originality.

Papers are to be submitted electronically at in PDF format. Submissions must be in the ACM format (see and not exceed 12 pages. Authors are reminded that brevity is a virtue.

DLS 2015 will run a two-phase reviewing process to help authors make their final papers the best that they can be. After the first round of reviews, papers will be rejected, conditionally accepted, or unconditionally accepted. Conditionally accepted papers will be given a list of issues raised by reviewers. Authors will then submit a revised version of the paper with a cover letter explaining how they have or why they have not addressed these issues. The reviewers will then consider the cover letter and revised paper and recommend final acceptance or rejection.

Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

Important dates

Abstract Submissions: Sun 7 Jun 2015

Full Submissions: Sun 15 Jun 2015

First phase notification: Mon 27 Jul

Revisions due: Mon 3 Aug

Final notification: Mon 17 Aug

Camera ready: Fri 21 21 Aug

Program chair

Manuel Serrano, Inria Sophia-Antipolis,

Program committee

Carl Friedrich Bolz, DE

William R. Cook, UTexas, USA

Jonathan Edwards, MIT, USA

John Field, Google, USA

Matt Flatt, USA

Elisa Gonzalez Boix, Vrije Universiteit, BE

Robert Hirschfeld, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, DE

Benjamin Livshits, Microsoft, USA

Crista Lopes, UC Irvine, USA

Kevin Millikin, Google, DN

James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

Manuel Serrano, Inria, FR (General chair)

Didier Verna, EPITA, FR

Jan Vitek, Purdue, USA

Joe Politz, Brown University, USA

Olivier Tardieu, IBM, USA

Robert Hirschfeld


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